The Phoenix Concert Theatre Will Likely Shut Its Doors After Landowners Plan For 39-Storey Building

The Phoenix Concert Theatre Will Likely Shut Its Doors After Landowners Plan For 39-Storey Building

The Toronto Indie Institution may see its days numbered as the newest target of widescale development.
PHOTO CREDIT:
a line awaits the phoenix concert theatre at night in toronto winter

One of Toronto’s coolest venues, the 1350-capacity, level ground, alternative powerhouse Phoenix Theatre might have seen the beginning of its end yesterday.

BlogTO has shared a development application submitted for a rezoning permit to Toronto City Hall that wishes to facilitate the redevelopment of property at 310 Sherbourne St. for a 39-storey mixed use building.

The application’s projection for 30,419 square meters of residential and 281 square meters of commercial greatly outnumbers the property’s current use as a music venue and medical building (The Phoenix occupies about 1700 square meters) and constitutes significantly higher value.

Details of the project’s residential spaces and if they will be rentals or condominiums will likely be available once a full submission is made by the city.

SMACK has reached out to City Hall for building records in order to seek out the landowner for a statement of intent.

A source close to SMACK whose close ties to the housing market provide insights into local developments says The Phoenix’s closure or relocation is a near certainty as the building is not heritage-protected. Public hearings will likely fold to allow the use of land for a more vertically inclined property. With a stagnant live circuit froze by the pandemic until just recently, one can imagine the motives of a land developer to recover revenues lost.

The Phoenix Concert Theatre is beloved within the city for its terrific, sometimes fringe, but always consistent booking of local and travelling alternative acts.

The venue contains three distinct environments: The Main Room, its main live space; The Parlour, a separate dance area; and Le Loft, the balcony lounge. The Phoenix also hosts five bars, a projection screen, and one of the largest disco balls in Canada. It launched in early summer 1991 after dropping its original name and business, The Diamond Club, a dance bar that occasionally held concerts. A restaurant known as The Grapevine operated in the back.

Check out Then & Now’s history on The Diamond Club here.

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One of Toronto’s coolest venues, the 1350-capacity, level ground, alternative powerhouse Phoenix Theatre might have seen the beginning of its end yesterday.

BlogTO has shared a development application submitted for a rezoning permit to Toronto City Hall that wishes to facilitate the redevelopment of property at 310 Sherbourne St. for a 39-storey mixed use building.

The application’s projection for 30,419 square meters of residential and 281 square meters of commercial greatly outnumbers the property’s current use as a music venue and medical building (The Phoenix occupies about 1700 square meters) and constitutes significantly higher value.

Details of the project’s residential spaces and if they will be rentals or condominiums will likely be available once a full submission is made by the city.

SMACK has reached out to City Hall for building records in order to seek out the landowner for a statement of intent.

A source close to SMACK whose close ties to the housing market provide insights into local developments says The Phoenix’s closure or relocation is a near certainty as the building is not heritage-protected. Public hearings will likely fold to allow the use of land for a more vertically inclined property. With a stagnant live circuit froze by the pandemic until just recently, one can imagine the motives of a land developer to recover revenues lost.

The Phoenix Concert Theatre is beloved within the city for its terrific, sometimes fringe, but always consistent booking of local and travelling alternative acts.

The venue contains three distinct environments: The Main Room, its main live space; The Parlour, a separate dance area; and Le Loft, the balcony lounge. The Phoenix also hosts five bars, a projection screen, and one of the largest disco balls in Canada. It launched in early summer 1991 after dropping its original name and business, The Diamond Club, a dance bar that occasionally held concerts. A restaurant known as The Grapevine operated in the back.

Check out Then & Now’s history on The Diamond Club here.

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